Science Curriculum Map

Tabs

K

Trimester 1

TOPIC

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

Physical Science

Five Senses

Earth Science

Apples

Understand the 5 senses and the body parts we

need for each

Identify different types of apples

Identify different foods with apples

Identify stages of an apple tree

Science Weekly

Discussion

Examples of how we use each sense

Story Books

Discussions

Examples of food

Growing an Apple Tree worksheet

Trimester 2

TOPIC

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

Earth

Sun, Moon and Stars

Identify objects in the sky

Explain the difference between day and night

Identify activities you can do during the day and night

Science Weekly

Story Books

Draw pictures of day/night

Discussions of day/night

Trimester 3

TOPIC

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

Life Science

Growing Grass

Life Cycle of Butterfly

Farm Animals

Identify stages of growing grass

identify materials needed to grow grass

identify natural resources needed to grow grass

Identify the developmental stages in the

life cycle of a butterfly

Identify animals that live on a farm

Identify characteristics of these animals

Books

Science Weekly

Grass growing experiment

Recording of observations during experiment

Butterfly Kit

Observing and recording

Field trip to the Howell Living Farm

Grade 1

Trimester 1

TOPIC

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

Physical Science

Energy and it's interaction with Matter

Sound

1. Observe temperature change and role on Matter

(I.E. Solid, liquid, gas)

2. Introduce Magnetism and explain polarity

1. Demonstrate how sounds are made

2. Compare different sounds

Informal/Formal Assessment

1. Ongoing observations of student's knowledge through classwork and participation.

1. Formal test identifying different stages of matter with explanation

2. Oral assessment with teacher describing magnets

and explaining polarity (North vs. South)

(Why magnets either attract or pull away)

1&2. Students will receive water bottles with various amounts of water. Students will explain

why bottles make particular sound based off of

amount of water in container (Less water, deeper

tone)

Trimester 2

TOPIC

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

LIFE SCIENCE

Behavior of Organisms

Evolution of Organisms

Animal Adaptations

1. Recognize living and non-living things

2. Differentiate between plant and animal life

3. Classify animal groups (ie. Mammals, reptiles etc..)

1. Role the environment plays on survival

/adaptation of plants and animals

2. Traits that allow for adaptations of plants and

Animals

1. Students will use knowledge of animal adaptations in a given environment to inform decisions about what humans need to do to adapt to that same environment.

2. Apply a step by step process to design and perform investigations to find answers to questions.

3. Utilize critical thinking skills to solve a problem.

Formal Assessment

1. Identify living and nonliving with examples

2. Identify parts of plants and function (Stem, leaves, roots, flowers)

3. Match animals to group based off of appropriate

characteristics (Scales - reptiles, Live birth-mammal)

Hands on/Anecdotal assessment: Students will grow plants with various needs

2.(Different sun/water amount) and will keep a

3.Journal tracking progress and making predictions

1.Check for Understanding Summative Assessment

2.Documentation of each of the design process steps in the Launch Log

3.Discussion of each of the design process steps

4.Conclusion questions

5.Reflection on strengths and weaknesses of final design

Project Lead the Way

mypltw.org

Canvas App on iPAd

Trimester 3

TOPIC

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

Space Exploration

Earth

Space Exploration

1. Recognize day vs. night in relation to Earth's

rotation

2. Establish understanding of process that causes

seasonal change - Earth tilt on axis

1. Identify Solar System- Find and name Earth, Moon,

Sun

2. Develop understanding of needs for space travel

(Space ship, suit, survival needs)

1&2 Oral Assessment

Student will meet with teacher and a globe.

Students will model rotation/tilt and explain how

Earth's environments are effected.

Formal Assessment

1. Students will complete assignment/project about

one solar system body. Presents to class

2. Writing Piece - If I Went to the Moon

Writing piece will demonstrate knowledge of needs

for space travel while incorporating imagination

to personalize the story

Grade 2

Trimester 1

TOPIC

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

Earth

To understand the Earth and the dynamics that shapes it.

To understand the composition of the Earth

To understand changing land forms

To understand weather and seasons

Weather assessment

Create 3D model of the Earth

Creation of weather instruments

Trimester 2

TOPIC

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

Life

Reproduction and heredity/genetics

To understand the interdependence of organisms

Teacher prepared tests/quizzes/assessments

Class discussion

Trimester 3

TOPIC

OBJECTIVES

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

Chemical and Physical Changes

To understand the 4 properties of matter.

To identify the steps of the water cycle

To identify forces and magnetism concepts.

Science experiment using gas, solid and liquid

Water Cycle model

Experiments, science journals

Grade 3

Trimester 1

TOPIC

STANDARDS

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

  • -How offspring are like their parents
  • -What is an ecosystem
  • -Classify plants
  • -Plants use leaves to make food
  • -Plants use roots and stems to grow
  • -Plants use flowers/cones to reproduce
  • -Plant life cycles
  • -How living things get energy
  • -How ecosystems change
  • -Food chains and webs
  • -Living things impact on environment

Chapter 3

Chapter 4 – Lesson 2

Chapter 5

*Supplemental –

Chapter 4 Lessons 3&4 from Grade 4 text

3-LS1-1. Develop models to describe that organisms have unique and diverse life cycles but all have in common birth, growth, reproduction, and death. [Clarification Statement: Changes organisms go through during their life form a pattern.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment of plant life cycles is limited to those of flowering plants. Assessment does not include details of human reproduction.]

3-LS2-1. Construct an argument that some animals form groups that help members survive.

3-LS3-1. Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence that plants and animals have traits inherited from parents and that variation of these traits exists in a group of similar organisms. [Clarification Statement: Patterns are the similarities and differences in traits shared between offspring and their parents, or among siblings. Emphasis is on organisms other than humans.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include genetic mechanisms of inheritance and prediction of traits. Assessment is limited to non-human examples.]

3-LS3-2. Use evidence to support the explanation that traits can be influenced by the environment. [Clarification Statement: Examples of the environment affecting a trait could include normally tall plants grown with insufficient water are stunted; and, a pet dog that is given too much food and little exercise may become overweight.]

3-LS4-1. Analyze and interpret data from fossils to provide evidence of the organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago. [Clarification Statement: Examples of data could include type, size, and distributions of fossil organisms. Examples of fossils and environments could include marine fossils found on dry land, tropical plant fossils found in Arctic areas, and fossils of extinct organisms.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include identification of specific fossils or present plants and animals. Assessment is limited to major fossil types and relative ages.]

3-LS4-2. Use evidence to construct an explanation for how the variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing. [Clarification Statement: Examples of cause and effect relationships could be plants that have larger thorns than other plants may be less likely to be eaten by predators; and, animals that have better camouflage coloration than other animals may be more likely to survive and therefore more likely to leave offspring.]

3-LS4-3. Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. [Clarification Statement: Examples of evidence could include needs and characteristics of the organisms and habitats involved. The organisms and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.]

3-LS4-4. Make a claim about the merit of a solution to a problem caused when the environment changes and the types of plants and animals that live there may change.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of environmental changes could include changes in land characteristics, water distribution, temperature, food, and other organisms.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to a single environmental change. Assessment does not include the greenhouse effect or climate change.]

Trimester 2

TOPIC

STANDARDS

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

  • -Water Cycle
  • -Weather and Climate
  • -Describing features of Earth’s surface
  • -Weathering and Erosion
  • -Minerals and Rocks
  • -Soil

Chapter 6 – ALL**

Focus on Lessons 1, 2, 5, and 6.

3 and 4 are supplemental

PLTW: Programming Patterns

3-ESS2-1. Represent data in tables and graphical displays to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season. [Clarification Statement: Examples of data could include average temperature, precipitation, and wind direction.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment of graphical displays is limited to pictographs and bar graphs. Assessment does not include climate change.]

3-ESS2-2. Obtain and combine information to describe climates in different regions of the world.

3-ESS3-1. Make a claim about the merit of a design solution that reduces the impacts of a weather-related hazard.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of design solutions to weather-related hazards could include barriers to prevent flooding, wind resistant roofs, and lightning rods.]

3-5-ETS1-1. Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

3-5-ETS1-2. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

3-5-ETS1-3. Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

ETS1.A Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems—Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into accounts.

ETS1.B Developing Possible Solutions—Research on a problem should be carried out before beginning to design a solution. At whatever stage, communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and shared ideas can lead to improved designs.

Crosscutting Concept—Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World - People’s needs and wants change over time, as do their demands for new and improved technologies.

Crosscutting Concept—Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World—Engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones to increase their benefits, decrease known risks, and meet societal demands.

Crosscutting Concept—Cause and Effect—Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified.

Crosscutting Concept—Cause and Effect—Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified, tested, and used to explain change.

Programming Patterns Check for Understanding Worksheet Activities 1-5

100 index cards (3 x 5 inches)

100 envelopes (any size that fits 3 x 5 cards)

Dog ears headband (1 per class)

Rosie's Runtime Game board consisting of 24 vinyl circles (1 per class)

Game tiles (1 set per class)

Code cards (6 sets per class)

Launch Logs

Tablets

2 x 2 inches self-stick notes (60 per class)

Canvas by Instructure

Hopscotch

Trimester 3

TOPIC

STANDARDS

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

  • -Motion
  • -Forces affect on motion
  • -Gravity
  • -Static electricity
  • -Magnetism
  • -Transformation of electricity and magnetism

Chapter 10 ALL

*Supplemental –

Chapter 9, Lessons 1, 4&5 Grade 4 text

3-PS2-1. Plan and conduct an investigation to provide evidence of the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object. [Clarification Statement: Examples could include an unbalanced force on one side of a ball can make it start moving; and, balanced forces pushing on a box from both sides will not produce any motion at all.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to one variable at a time: number, size, or direction of forces. Assessment does not include quantitative force size, only qualitative and relative. Assessment is limited to gravity being addressed as a force that pulls objects down.]

3-PS2-2. Make observations and/or measurements of an object’s motion to provide evidence that a pattern can be used to predict future motion. [Clarification Statement: Examples of motion with a predictable pattern could include a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, and two children on a see-saw.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include technical terms such as period and frequency.]

3-PS2-3. Ask questions to determine cause and effect relationships of electric or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with each other. [Clarification Statement: Examples of an electric force could include the force on hair from an electrically charged balloon and the electrical forces between a charged rod and pieces of paper; examples of a magnetic force could include the force between two permanent magnets, the force between an electromagnet and steel paperclips, and the force exerted by one magnet versus the force exerted by two magnets. Examples of cause and effect relationships could include how the distance between objects affects strength of the force and how the orientation of magnets affects the direction of the magnetic force.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to forces produced by objects that can be manipulated by students, and electrical interactions are limited to static electricity.]

3-PS2-4. Define a simple design problem that can be solved by applying scientific ideas about magnets.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of problems could include constructing a latch to keep a door shut and creating a device to keep two moving objects from touching each other.]

Grade 4

Trimester 1

TOPIC

STANDARDS

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

-Forms of energy

-Sound Energy

-Light Energy

-Heat

Chapter 8 – ALL

* Supplemental material from Chapter 12 Lesson 3 Grade 5 text

4-PS3-1. Use evidence to construct an explanation relating the speed of an object to the energy of that object. [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include quantitative measures of changes in the speed of an object or on any precise or quantitative definition of energy.]

4-PS3-2. Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents. [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include quantitative measurements of energy.]

4-PS3-3. Ask questions and predict outcomes about the changes in energy that occur when objects collide. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the change in the energy due to the change in speed, not on the forces, as objects interact.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include quantitative measurements of energy.]

4-PS3-4. Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of devices could include electric circuits that convert electrical energy into motion energy of a vehicle, light, or sound; and, a passive solar heater that converts light into heat. Examples of constraints could include the materials, cost, or time to design the device.] [Assessment Boundary: Devices should be limited to those that convert motion energy to electric energy or use stored energy to cause motion or produce light or sound.]

4-PS4-1. Develop a model of waves to describe patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength and that waves can cause objects to move. [Clarification Statement: Examples of models could include diagrams, analogies, and physical models using wire to illustrate wavelength and amplitude of waves.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include interference effects, electromagnetic waves, non-periodic waves, or quantitative models of amplitude and wavelength.]

4-PS4-2. Develop a model to describe that light reflecting from objects and entering the eye allows objects to be seen. [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include knowledge of specific colors reflected and seen, the cellular mechanisms of vision, or how the retina works.]

4-PS4-3. Generate and compare multiple solutions that use patterns to transfer information.

Supplemental material from Chapter 12 Lesson 3 Grade 5 text

Trimester 2

TOPIC

STANDARDS

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

-Fossils

-Minerals

-Rocks

-Soil

-Erosion and Deposition

-Changes to Earth’s surface

-Energy Resources

-Pollution

Chapter 4 – Lessons 5&6

Chapter 5 – Lesson 3

*Supplemental

Chapter 8 Grade 5 text

Energy Conversion

(PLTW) Activity 1 & 2

4-ESS1-1. Identify evidence from patterns in rock formations and fossils in rock layers to support an explanation for changes in a landscape over time. [Clarification Statement: Examples of evidence from patterns could include rock layers with marine shell fossils above rock layers with plant fossils and no shells, indicating a change from land to water over time; and, a canyon with different rock layers in the walls and a river in the bottom, indicating that over time a river cut through the rock.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include specific knowledge of the mechanism of rock formation or memorization of specific rock formations and layers. Assessment is limited to relative time.]

4-ESS2-1. Make observations and/or measurements to provide evidence of the effects of weathering or the rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, or vegetation. [Clarification Statement: Examples of variables to test could include angle of slope in the downhill movement of water, amount of vegetation, speed of wind, relative rate of deposition, cycles of freezing and thawing of water, cycles of heating and cooling, and volume of water flow.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to a single form of weathering or erosion.]

4-ESS2-2. Analyze and interpret data from maps to describe patterns of Earth’s features. [Clarification Statement: Maps can include topographic maps of Earth’s land and ocean floor, as well as maps of the locations of mountains, continental boundaries, volcanoes, and earthquakes.]

4-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment. [Clarification Statement: Examples of renewable energy resources could include wind energy, water behind dams, and sunlight; non-renewable energy resources are fossil fuels and fissile materials. Examples of environmental effects could include loss of habitat due to dams, loss of habitat due to surface mining, and air pollution from burning of fossil fuels.]

4-ESS3-2. Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural Earth processes on humans.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of solutions could include designing an earthquake resistant building and improving monitoring of volcanic activity.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to earthquakes, floods, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions.]

• 4-PS3-2. Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

• 4-PS3-4. Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.

• PS2.A: Forces and Motion – Each force acts on one particular object and has both strength and a direction. An object at rest typically has multiple forces acting on it, but they add to give zero net force on the object. Forces that do not sum to zero can cause changes in the object’s speed or direction of motion. • PS2.A: Forces and Motion – The patterns of an object’s motion in various situations can be observed and measured; when that past motion exhibits a regular pattern, future motion can be predicted from it.

• PS2.B: Types of Interactions – Objects in contact exert forces on each other.

• PS2.B: Types of Interactions – Electric, and magnetic forces between a pair of objects do not require that the objects be in contact. The sizes of the forces in each situation depend on the properties of the objects and their distances apart and, for forces between two magnets, on their orientation relative to each other.

• 3-5-ETS1-1. Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

• 3-5-ETS1-2. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

• 3-5-ETS1-3. Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved. • ETS1.A Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems – Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into accounts.

• ETS1.B Developing Possible Solutions – Research on a problem should be carried out before beginning to design a solution. At whatever stage, communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and shared ideas can lead to improved designs. • Science and Engineering Practices – Asking Questions and Defining Problems – Asking questions and Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to specifying qualitative relationships. • Science and Engineering Practices – Developing and Using Models – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to building and revising simple models and using models to represent events and design solutions. • Science and Engineering Practices – Planning and Carrying Out Investigations – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to include investigations that control variables and provide evidence to support explanations or design solutions. • Science and Engineering Practices – Analyzing and Interpreting Data – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to introducing quantitative approaches to collecting data and conducting multiple trials of qualitative observations. When possible and feasible, digital tools should be used. • Science and Engineering Practices – Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to extending quantitative measurements to a variety of physical properties and using computation and mathematics to analyze data and compare alternative design solutions. • Science and Engineering Practices – Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to the use of evidence in constructing explanations that specify variables that describe and predict phenomena and in designing multiple solutions to design problems. • Science and Engineering Practices – Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to evaluating the merit and accuracy of ideas and methods. • Crosscutting Concept – Patterns – Patterns can be used as evidence to support an explanation. • Crosscutting Concept – Cause and Effect – Case and effect relationships are routinely identified, tested, and used to explain change. • Crosscutting Concept – Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World - People’s needs and wants change over time, as do their demands for new and improved technologies. • Crosscutting Concept – Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World - Engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones to increase their benefits, decrease known risks, and meet societal demands.

• Popplet presentation of potential and kinetic energy classroom examples • Student documentation and presentation of potential and kinetic energy classroom examples • Responses to Part 2 Observing a KinetiCan • Responses to Part 4 Converting Chemical to Mechanical Energy • Conclusion questions

• Observation documentation of each station in Launch Log • Responses to the three prompts presented in Step Part 1 #3. • Labels of part 1 documentation completed in step Part 2 #5 • Digital presentation ofone observed energy conversion • Conclusion questions

mypltw.org

Trimester 3

TOPIC

STANDARDS

ASSESSMENT

RESOURCES

-Classification of plants and animals

-Plant reproduction

-How plants make food

-Adaptations

-Inherited characteristics of plants and animals

-Animal response to environment

Chapter 3 - ALL

Energy Conversion

(PLTW)

Activity 3, Project 4, Problem 5

4-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information to describe that energy and fuels are derived from natural resources and their uses affect the environment. [Clarification Statement: Examples of renewable energy resources could include wind energy, water behind dams, and sunlight; non-renewable energy resources are fossil fuels and fissile materials. Examples of environmental effects could include loss of habitat due to dams, loss of habitat due to surface mining, and air pollution from burning of fossil fuels.]

4-ESS3-2. Generate and compare multiple solutions to reduce the impacts of natural Earth processes on humans.* [Clarification Statement: Examples of solutions could include designing an earthquake resistant building and improving monitoring of volcanic activity.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to earthquakes, floods, tsunamis, and volcanic eruptions.]

4-LS1-1. Construct an argument that plants and animals have internal and external structures that function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction. [Clarification Statement: Examples of structures could include thorns, stems, roots, colored petals, heart, stomach, lung, brain, and skin.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment is limited to macroscopic structures within plant and animal systems.]

4-LS1-2. Use a model to describe that animals receive different types of information through their senses, process the information in their brain, and respond to the information in different ways. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on systems of information transfer.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include the mechanisms by which the brain stores and recalls information or the mechanisms of how sensory receptors function.]

• 4-PS3-2. Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

• 4-PS3-4. Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.

• PS2.A: Forces and Motion – Each force acts on one particular object and has both strength and a direction. An object at rest typically has multiple forces acting on it, but they add to give zero net force on the object. Forces that do not sum to zero can cause changes in the object’s speed or direction of motion. • PS2.A: Forces and Motion – The patterns of an object’s motion in various situations can be observed and measured; when that past motion exhibits a regular pattern, future motion can be predicted from it.

• PS2.B: Types of Interactions – Objects in contact exert forces on each other.

• PS2.B: Types of Interactions – Electric, and magnetic forces between a pair of objects do not require that the objects be in contact. The sizes of the forces in each situation depend on the properties of the objects and their distances apart and, for forces between two magnets, on their orientation relative to each other.

• 3-5-ETS1-1. Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

• 3-5-ETS1-2. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

• 3-5-ETS1-3. Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved. • ETS1.A Defining and Delimiting Engineering Problems – Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desired features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into accounts.

• ETS1.B Developing Possible Solutions – Research on a problem should be carried out before beginning to design a solution. At whatever stage, communicating with peers about proposed solutions is an important part of the design process, and shared ideas can lead to improved designs. • Science and Engineering Practices – Asking Questions and Defining Problems – Asking questions and Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to specifying qualitative relationships. • Science and Engineering Practices – Developing and Using Models – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to building and revising simple models and using models to represent events and design solutions. • Science and Engineering Practices – Planning and Carrying Out Investigations – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to include investigations that control variables and provide evidence to support explanations or design solutions. • Science and Engineering Practices – Analyzing and Interpreting Data – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to introducing quantitative approaches to collecting data and conducting multiple trials of qualitative observations. When possible and feasible, digital tools should be used. • Science and Engineering Practices – Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to extending quantitative measurements to a variety of physical properties and using computation and mathematics to analyze data and compare alternative design solutions. • Science and Engineering Practices – Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to the use of evidence in constructing explanations that specify variables that describe and predict phenomena and in designing multiple solutions to design problems. • Science and Engineering Practices – Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information – Builds on K-2 experiences and progresses to evaluating the merit and accuracy of ideas and methods. • Crosscutting Concept – Patterns – Patterns can be used as evidence to support an explanation. • Crosscutting Concept – Cause and Effect – Case and effect relationships are routinely identified, tested, and used to explain change. • Crosscutting Concept – Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World - People’s needs and wants change over time, as do their demands for new and improved technologies. • Crosscutting Concept – Influence of Science, Engineering, and Technology on Society and the Natural World - Engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones to increase their benefits, decrease known risks, and meet societal demands.

• Educreations app document prediction of how energy is converted between forms using a coin battery and LED • Popplet presentation of one energy source • Conclusion questions

• Popplet presentation of the design solution • Conclusion questions

• Documentation in the Launch Log of each of the design process steps • Physical construction of the prototype • Results of the prototype testing • Communication of the design solution • Conclusion questions

mypltw.org

Grade 5

Trimester 1

TOPIC

STANDARDS

Mini Labs

LABS

-What makes up matter

-Describing matter

-Solid, liquid, gas

-Mixtures and Solutions

-How matter changes

-What are forces

Chapter 10 – ALL

Chapter 11 – Lesson 1

5-PS1-1. Develop a model to describe that matter is made of particles too small to be seen. [Examples of evidence could include adding air to expand a basketball, compressing air in a syringe, dissolving sugar in water, and evaporating salt water.]

5-PS1-2. Measure and graph quantities to provide evidence that regardless of the type of change that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of matter is conserved. [Examples of reactions or changes could include phase changes, dissolving, and mixing that form new substances.]

5-PS1-3. Make observations and measurements to identify materials based on their properties. [Examples of materials to be identified could include baking soda and other powders, metals, minerals, and liquids. Examples of properties could include color, hardness, reflectivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, response to magnetic forces, and solubility; density is not intended as an identifiable property.]

5-PS1-4. Conduct an investigation to determine whether the mixing of two or more substances results in new substances.

5-PS2-1. Support an argument that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed down. “Down” is a local description of the direction that points toward the center of the spherical Earth.

1. Balloon pumps to demonstrate matter is made of particles too small to be seen

2. Baking soda and vinegar chemical reaction – measure and weigh

3. evaporation of ice

1. Mystery Bags

2. Properties of Matter – list properties of unknown substances (powder, salt, sugar, baking soda, splenda, magnets, paper clips, clay) list the properties to determine unknown substance (2 days)

Determine conductivity and solubility of those materials

3. Assessment -- Sorting a mixture by properties

4. Element sort to determine patterns of Periodic Table

5. Understanding speed and force – marbles with ramps

End of 1st Trimester Notes: Resources: Chapter 10, 11 Lesson Check sheets, various foldables for interactive notebook

Assessments: Quizzes – Atoms, Compounds, Periodic Table; Changes in Matter; Physical and

Chemical and Physical Changes; Design your own Matter Test; Sorting Mixture Lab

Trimester 2

TOPIC

STANDARDS

MINI LABS

LABS

-Water cycle

-What is the ocean

-Formation of clouds and precipitation

-Climate

Chapter 7 – ALL

5-ESS1-2. Represent data in graphical displays to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky.

5-ESS2-2. Describe and graph the amounts and percentages of water and fresh water in various reservoirs to provide evidence about the distribution of water on Earth.

1. temperature differences on round earth

2. absorbing and reflecting sunlight

3. measure shadow over a period of time

4. air pressure with a mylar balloon

5. collect and evaporate water

1. uneven heating of the earth

2. weight of air

3. collect data and forecast weather

4. evaporation of salt water (page 264 or rock candy)

End of 2nd Trimester Notes: Trip to the Franklin Institute with scavenger hunt assignment and Weather Show

Resources: Chapter 7 Lesson check sheets, various foldables for interactive notebook

Assessments: Weather Unit Test; Forecasting project booklet

Trimester 3

TOPIC

STANDARDS

MINI LABS

LABS

-How Earth moves

-Asteroids, meteors, comets, and moons

- PLTW Intro to Robotics

Chapter 9 – Lessons

1, 2 , 5

5-ESS3-1. Obtain and combine information about ways individual communities use science ideas to protect the Earth’s resources and environment.

ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems - Human activities in agriculture, industry, and everyday life have had major effects on the land, vegetation, streams, ocean, air, and even outer space. But individuals and communities are doing things to help protect Earth’s resources and environments.

3-5-ETS1-1. Define a simple design problem reflecting a need or a want that includes specified criteria for success and constraints on materials, time, or cost.

3-5-ETS1-2. Generate and compare multiple possible solutions to a problem based on how well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of the problem.

3-5-ETS1-3. Plan and carry out fair tests in which variables are controlled and failure points are considered to identify aspects of a model or prototype that can be improved.

1. build an airplane with oral directions

2. build an spectroscope

3. sunlight striking the earth

4. meteoroid falling through the atmosphere

1. build a robot with inputs and outputs (PLTW activity 2)

2. build a robot to move blocks (PLTW activity 4)

3. make up of comet – dry ice lab

4. Trip the Buehler Challenger Space Station

End of 3rd Trimester Notes: Trip to Buehler Challenger Space Center

Resources: Chapter 9 Lesson check sheets; various foldables for interactive notebook

Assessments: Space quiz, notes for press conference from Space Mission, PLTW Environmental

Design Problem

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

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